Source:Living Heritage

Ep151 – Field to Flight: The Transatlantic Air Race, 100 years later

In September 1913, flying was very new, very risky, and very exciting. Records were made, then broken. No one had ever flown across the Atlantic nonstop. Lord Northcliffe, the owner of Britain’s Daily Mail, wanted to change that with a contest. Many teams were ready to try in 1914—then the Great War broke out and the contest was put on hold. In November 1918, just three days after the Armistice, the race was back on. The right departure point would be key. For a few exciting weeks in the spring of 1919, the teams set themselves up here in Newfoundland.

2019 marks a century since the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic and Admiralty House is creating a new exhibit titled “Field to Flight”. The exhibit will highlight some of the major players of a historic race and feature Margaret Carter, a St. John’s women and her perspective on the race. We chat with Museum Manager Sarah Wade about the air race, but also manage to talk about Twinkletoes the cat, fur coats, and beer!

Share This